Tag Archives: remote controlled trucks

Radio Remote Controls

ONB Interviews Steve Belyea on BASE and His Empire of Radio Remote Controls

After BASE’s Export Awards win in the summer of 2014, Heather MacLean of Opportunities NB (ONB) sat down with Steve Belyea, CEO of BASE Engineering, to discuss his success story and his company of radio remote controls.

 

Another Innovative New Brunswick Success: BASE Engineering

BASE Engineering is a market leader in radio remote control technology having now deployed more than 75,000 systems worldwide. With clients located in nearly every corner of the globe, BASE chose the most strategic location they could to build its world class facilities. They chose Saint John, New Brunswick.

Opportunities NB (ONB) wanted to learn more about this New Brunswick success story, so we spoke to Steve Belyea, President and CEO.

ONB: BASE Engineering won the 2014 New Brunswick Export Award for Exporter of the Year. Can you tell us what that meant to you and your business?

Belyea: It was great to be recognized for our export work. We decided on day one to ignore any and all borders where possible, and promote our technology around the world. Our efforts in the United States have paid huge dividends and we are the market leader in our space. I think the export award is reinforcement for our staff that we are doing a world class job – I am very proud of them.

ONB: BASE Engineering focuses on the petroleum industry, specifically developing radio remote control technology. Can you go into that technology a bit more for us?

Belyea: Nearly twenty years ago we saw an opportunity to apply electronic technology in areas of the petroleum industry that were previously very manual or mechanical. We developed safety controls that would allow faster response to hazardous emergencies and allow the operators to respond to leaks and fires from a safe distance by remote controlling the petroleum tank and pipe valves and pumps. This initial product has grown into an entire catalog of remote control solutions for the gas and oil industry that now includes tanker trucks, fuel storage facilities, offshore and land based oil rigs, aircraft refueling, and ship refueling. We’ve also just installed a system at Virgin Galactic’s new Space Port America in New Mexico.

ONB: What countries are you currently exporting to?

Belyea: Primarily the US but we also have excellent distribution in the UK, Australia, New Zealand, Italy, Turkey, Poland, Spain, Czech Republic, Israel, Chile, Brazil, Panama, Mexico and several other countries.

ONB: What country do you export most to?

Belyea: The United States due to its proximity, market size, and cultural similarities.

ONB: Your company could be located almost anywhere. Why did you choose New Brunswick? What is it about New Brunswick that has helped your company become so successful?

Belyea: We were born and raised here – my family has been here for 250 years – this is home. Our way of life outweighs the travel and winter challenges. Also, I think our people are genuine and have a great work ethic – I truly believe that we have the best people we could find anywhere on the planet.

ONB: Do you partner with any other New Brunswick companies to deliver your products?

Belyea: In terms of the supply chain, yes. We partner with as many local and regional companies as possible to secure our inventory and service needs. These relationships go back to our beginnings when we were a high risk and we haven’t forgotten the value these relationships add to our business.

ONB: Would you say there is a cluster of great companies that support the petroleum industry in New Brunswick?

Belyea: I think that cluster is developing right now, certainly. Traditionally, there have been few players in this space within the province but with recent natural gas, pipeline, and exploration initiatives, we are seeing increased momentum and opportunity.

Wireless Controls for Fuel Trucks

ProControl 2 Featured in FON June 2015 – Wireless Controls for Fuel Trucks

ProControl 2 and other Wireless Controls for Fuel Trucks labeled a “Communication Trend” for the Petroleum Distribution Industry

BASE’s revolutionary ProControl 2 was featured in Fuel Oil News’ “Dispatch and Communication Trends” write-up from June 2015.

The article, which examines wireless controls for fuel trucks from several companies, begins on page 30 and can be found here: http://read.dmtmag.com/i/517425-fuel-oil-news-june-2015

Or through these images:
FON1          FON2       FON3

 

 

The ProControl 2

The ProControl 2 boasts up to 9 channels of customizable controls, remote meter display and RFID reader capability. This handheld is used primarily in the petrochemical industry for fleet refueling and home delivery trucks where pump and volume control is critical.

With a range of approximately 1000 feet, the ProControl 2 increases safety and reduces spill risk, ensuring more efficient operations for your company. The ProControl 2 can also be paired with the BASEstation for the ultimate fuel delivery system.

 

BASE’s NPGA Southeastern Educational Session a Success

At this year’s NPGA Southeastern Convention, BASE’s own Jason LeVine, Director of Sales – Truck Automation, delivered a dynamic educational presentation: “What to Expect When Implementing Truck Automation”. Download the presentation here: NPGA 2015 BASE Presentation.

The latest issue of Butane Propane News focuses on the NPGA convention and the workshop where Jason presented!

Follow the link to check the e-version, or simply read below for the BASE section.

“Lifting of Perc Restriction Highlights Southeastern Event”

 

Jason Levine, director of sales, truck automation, for BASE Engineering (Saint John, N.B.), conducted an additional session in the Propane Delivery Automation Workshop titled, “What to Expect When Implementing Truck Automation.” The presentation focused on the project management involved with executing a truck automation system. Marketers buying an automation system should look at it as a project, not just a purchase, Levine noted. For many propane bobtail products such as valves and meters, the marketer can bolt the system on and walk away. He might not have to collaborate with anyone until something goes wrong. But executing products such as billing systems, inventory management systems, or fleet tracking systems involves dealing with more moving parts than a marketer can imagine.

“The idea is, this has to be managed like a project,” Levine said. “Like a civil engineering project, if you were to re-engineer the Hoover Dam, you wouldn’t say, ‘Build me a dam tomorrow.’ You want to have clear expectations, [and] understand what the scope of the project is. Even if you don’t believe it’s your responsibility, it’s good you’re educated on how and what to do. That will help the project move forward much smoother.”

Whether a marketer is switching to a new automation system or going to automation for the first time, it involves stress because you are in a sense changing the way you run your business. You’re changing the way the drivers interact with something in the vehicle, and you’re changing the way the accounting team interacts with a new piece of software in the office.

“This has historically been painful, and it’s better to be prepared for what to expect than to let that creep up on you. By the time the next November or even October arrives, you start getting ramped up for the next peak season, and you realize, ‘I waited too long to put the system on, and I’m still struggling,’” Levine noted. Planning should take place from contemplation to realization, answering questions such as who will install the product and how the truck builders are involved.

“If you have a road map laid out for you, you will feel more comfortable in all the discussions you have with the various vendors so you are not in the dark about ‘What are they talking about?’ ‘Why the delay?’ ‘Why are the lead times so long?’ These are all things you want to be aware of before you make the initial call to start discussing truck automation.”

Marketers should also identify a “champion” at their company to oversee the process. “The champion is the one who believes that without this solution, the project will not succeed, and at all costs will be the one that helps push through all the political issues both internally and externally.” In a small company, the owner might be the champion who makes sure the accounting team, the drivers, and IT staff have bought into the project. “Without a champion, I guarantee the project will not succeed, because when something needs to happen, you won’t have that one person who will drive meetings to completion [and] make sure everyone’s schedules are coordinated with the start-up.”

RCU “End of Life” Announcement

BASE Official Announcement – RCU Handheld No Longer Manufactured

BASE Engineering Announces “End of Life” for RCU Handheld (Original Remote Readout ProControl)

Effective December 31, 2014, BASE will cease production of the RCU handheld (original Remote Readout ProControl handheld) for new purchases.

For more information, including information on active products under warranty, please view our full announcement / Press Release here: RCU End of Life PR Dec 2.

BASE Wins NB Exporter of the Year Award (Video)

NB Exporter of the Year Award goes to BASE Engineering!

The 2014 New Brunswick Export Awards took place June 9 in Saint John, NB. Six provincial awards were given to local companies for outstanding export performance in the international marketplace. BASE Engineering was honoured to accept the most coveted award of all – New Brunswick Exporter of the Year 2014!

See all of the winners here.

Introducing the G Receiver

BASE’s new ASKG receiver combines user friendly pre-wired relay contacts with new age technology to provide better overall performance.

Designed to be used as part of a system, the receiver can be used with BASE Engineering’s ASKW, ASKF or ASKR handhelds.

For more information, see our Press Release.